You Made It Yourself: Now What? 29 Places to Sell Your Handmade Creations

The word “handmade” evokes feelings of warmth, of comfort, of craftsmanship. Earlier this summer, I mentioned some cool niche sites serving the artisan community in my 19 new additions to a large ecommerce list.  Amazon and eBay are certainly well known marketplaces among those looking to sell just about anything, but niche marketplaces and communities are growing quickly. These 29 Marketplaces offer a way to buy and sell handmade goods.

crafts

Etsy is probably one of the best-known marketplaces for artisans and craftpeople of all types. You’ll find new and vintage goods on Etsy. You will find curated lists by category or topic as well as a directory of local shops in your area. They have an excellent blog with deeper topics, such as The Value of Home Economics and other topics you might not expect to find in an online marketplace.

ArtFire is a well-known indie marketplace with a great community feel to it.  Another feature that really stood out for me: you can place an item on your Amazon wishlist. The fact that ArtFire tied into Amazon’s Universal Wishlist technology is a brilliant move.

Supermarket offers an elegantly simple marketplace. They don’t offer every category under the sun, but four meta ones: everything, wear + carry, space + place, and paper + prints.  You’ll see photos of items on the home page; clicking that item takes you into a designer’s store. It is a clean and simple structure including a directory of designers.

eCrater is both a free Web store builder and an online marketplace. If you are a seller, you can create your own free online store in minutes. You can also import an eBay store into eCrater. If you are a buyer, you can browse and search millions of products.

Craftly is one of those hot, new startups that earns points for online marketing savvy. It’s online marketplace meets Kickstarter (the crowdfunding site), but for artists and craftspeople. The site is just getting started, but holds promise as a great place to test the market before you start making your product on a bigger scale.

Free Craft Fair is less a marketplace and more of a Yahoo-type directory. Still, it serves a purpose for those looking to get in front of craft buyers.

Handmade Artists’ Shop is a combination of marketplace and community forum. If you are looking for a collection of artists and craftspeople learning from one another, this forum might provide some useful help.

Folksy is a U.K.-based handmade goods marketplace. With everything from books to jewelry to soap, Folksy has plenty for sale. But they also have a Make magazine-style do-it-yourself section.

ShopWindoz (a German site) is for creatives of all types who are turning exciting ideas into unique products outside the mainstream. ShopWindoz gives designers and artists the opportunity to become shop owners and sell their products online to a global audience.

Notmassproduced is a do-it-for-you type of model.  You set up your store,  pricing and shipping, but they handle everything else. They manage the sales process, you ship to the customer, they pay you from the Notmassproduced service. Each vendor is selected to be on the site, so it validates each artisan to assure a match. U.K. and Europe focus.

Misi is a U.K. online craft marketplace. Sellers get a “free for life” shop including a subdomain. They have a forum to help you get your business started or to advance your marketing skills, for example. There is a low commission on sold items.

Coriandr is a fun U.K.-based marketplace for buying and selling handmade gifts. It has an easy-to-set-up storefront and some enthusiastic marketing materials and badges to drive people to your store. I like their gifts under £20 section (conceptually because it drives people to a bargain area in this crazy  economy). They even have a “mini shop” idea that lets you embed a store quickly into your own blog or website.

Dawanda takes an interesting approach that lets buyers create unique collections of products and share them with their friends. If you are a seller of handmade or unique products, this marketplace is well organized and looks seller-friendly.

SpoonFlower is one of my favorite discoveries for local, handmade products from artisans. They focus on fabric and make it possible for individuals to design, print and sell their own fabric designs. As many readers know, I love to find entrepreneurs who dig deep into a niche and do something no one else is doing. Spoonflower is precisely that. If you’re looking for fabrics or looking to sell them, try Spoonflower.

Zibbet looks pretty competitive with no listing fees, no commission fees and a free level account. What’s not to like about that? They have an Etsy importer, too, if you’re leaving that service.

I Made It Market is a nomadic indie crafts marketplace that provides opportunities for artists to bring their wares to market. They do it by partnering with community, arts and nonprofit organizations to raise funds and awareness to assist them in improving communities. Artists and craftspeople apply to be part of live events.

PoppyTalk Handmade is a monthly online street market curated by Poppytalk to showcase, buy and sell handmade goods of emerging design talent from around the world. The key word here is “curated” as PoppyTalk finds and accepts only certain merchants for its storefront. But the Buy button on this curated site drives the buyer back to your existing online storefront, whether it is your own, Etsy or another marketplace. They have won a number of awards for best blog and best site.

iCraft is for original handmade products, not vintage, not for resellers and not for food products. In fact, they are very, very specific about what they accept in their marketplace and it is actually refreshing to see such clarity. It may not be for everyone, but you will know if you fit or not. The pricing structure seems to resonate for lots of artisans.

Silk Fair allows you to have a free Market Booth on their marketplace or to build a full-fledged custom online store with their Web-based software. You can appear in the marketplace and as your own independent store.

Bonanza has been cited as the best alternative to eBay and Etsy. They have free listings and low fees. And something that caught my eye was their emphasis on having live humans available for sales consultations — to help you sell more — at no cost.

Made It Myself is a free marketplace where you can list your products for sale. It is still in beta and looks to be a rapidly growing community and handmade artisan service.

eBay has a special fair-trade marketplace that is worth mentioning. World of Good is a marketplace dedicated to socially and environmentally responsible shopping, featuring tens of thousands of stylish and unique products from around the world, and all backed by the eBay name.

Mymela is a marketplace for arts and crafts from India. It is a combination of ecommerce storefront and micro-finance in that buyers or consumers can also donate or make a small loan to an aspiring merchant. They call it Integrated Micro Advance Funding and it works slightly differently than traditional micro-finance.

Renegade Craft is not a directory or online marketplace, but a cool bunch of craft fairs around the world. Worth a look.

Of course, there are the Maker Faires, which are among the best known do-it-yourself events anywhere.

If you make or sell food items, check out the following:

Foodoro is a marketplace for artisanal food that connects passionate Foodmakers directly with consumers.. If you’re a food producer, this is an online storefront technology worth checking out.

Foodzie has a very cool model: They are not your traditional online marketplace and appear to take a commission on successful sales. So, if they are not successful in helping you sell more, it looks like you don’t pay anything. They help passionate small food producers and farmers across the U.S. reach new customers and connect directly to foodies searching for wonderful foods and gifts.

LocalHarvest is an organic and local food website. They offer a definitive and reliable directory of small farms, farmers markets and other local food sources around the nation.

Fooducopia is a marketplace for indie food producers and small scale farmers. You can open a store on their marketplace and they help do the heavy lifting, so to speak, of helping you sell and market your goods.

If you know of another online marketplaces that help independent artisans, craftspeople, makers, do-it-yourselfers, foodies, food producers and other creative types sell their wares, please drop it in the comments.


Image from kuleczka/Shutterstock

67 Comments ▼

TJ McCue - Product Editor


TJ McCue TJ McCue is the Product Editor for Small Business Trends and an entrepreneur who publishes Tech Biz Talk. TJ is a former Wall Street Journal columnist. He also writes for Forbes and American Express OPEN Forum. He loves learning about technology apps and software services - share yours with TJ.

67 Reactions

  1. For grass-fed beef growers, I would recommend http://www.GrassFedBeefDirectory.com in addition to LocalHarvest.

  2. Stellar addition, Robert! Thanks a ton. That’s a growing niche, for sure. Getting easier to find in markets, too. Central Market here in Poulsbo WA has a small section. Thanks.

  3. I may do another one of these focused just on the foodie worlds. I didn’t find many, but i know they must be out there. If you’re a foodie and you know of a niche food marketplace, please email it to me. Q4Sales at Gmail.

  4. If you’re into larger scale, the Chinese site Alibaba.com is worth looking at. More B2B but very powerful.

  5. Please include my site in your list for farmers. The concept is for farmers to post to the WordPress blog so Michigan residents can locate local sources for their produce and meat. Most are small farms raising free range livestock and poultry as well as produce. It’s all free and there’s no advertising cluttering up the site. Contact info@freshmichigan.com

    Thanks!

    Douglas Peterson

  6. TJ: I will mention your post for my friend Christer Sjoback. He has a gold & silver handicraft business.

    If you compile a foodie list, please let me know. I am interested in finding tea products to review for our site on tea.

  7. Super post, TJ! I’m familiar with most of these through my work leading Indie Beauty Network, but the Spoonflower is new to me. I love that concept! I’m going to tell my members they can have fabric customized for some of their products that could use special wrapping. What a cool idea! Thanks for all this inspiration!

  8. Great listing, TJ!
    However, there is one that I would like to add as well…Zaybia.com

    My partner and I have been developing this site to focus on helping the handmade community in Canada sell their items. We already have a great catalogue of over 2,000 items for sale and are growing quickly!

    Check it out!

    Lee

    t: @Zaybia_Handmade
    f: facebook.com/zaybia

  9. Hi TJ,

    One question I have is – How do these sites rate versus selling your own product from your own site? I know these sites get more traffic than most small indie handmade product sites get, but as a client brought up, “there is lots of competition on those sites – what if a customer goes there to buy my soaps, but sees someone else’s soap and buys that instead.” I countered that the number of your customers that go there is smaller than the number of general customers who are just looking for handmade soaps – you are more likely to find customers who never would have known you existed.

    I also know that some less tech-savvy customers may feel more comfortable purchasing from an online site like Etsy – than a smaller one-person shop with just Google check out or a paypal option. Does that seem a valid point?

    Cathy Larkin

    Anyone’s thoughts?

  10. Hi TJ! Great list…you should also check out Meylah (http://meylah.com), a new artisan online marketplace that launched last year and already has thousands of artisans selling their goods. The best part…it’s free to build your own online storefront and list your products in the marketplace.

    In addition to the physical handmade goods, Meylah also has created the ability for artisans to sell digital goods and online tutorials with a simple download after purchase. And, Meylah provides an incredible resource center free for anyone to learn all the tips and tricks of selling their products online!

  11. Hi Cathy
    I completely see your point and that of your client. It isn’t an easy shift to make, philosophically, with the way we’re taught in business classes (MBA, etc). I mean you’re entering a crowded area loaded with your competitors. My short answer would be that you have to go where your customers are and find other ways to stand out, in addition to an excellent product. Etsy is loaded with great products, true enough. But I would argue that many of the merchants/vendors/artisans do not spend enough time in their sites nurturing and developing relationships. That’s what it all comes down to — are you building relationships with your prospects and customers?

    That’s it. Not how many times you tweet, how many cool product photos you upload to your “deal of the day”, or how many FB likes you have — BUT how many people did you engage with today? Email, phone, in person. The rest is unimportant. I know people will debate that with me, but the majority of us are drinking the same Kool-Aid from the same cup, in the marketing worlds. Okay, so social is important, but not more important than the real, active conversation you can or should have with your customers. Everything else pales; everything else on social or otherwise will only matter if you engage.

    To your last point — I have mixed feelings. I would use Etsy to drive some degree of confidence, but if you’re doing the relationship stuff right, then they will likely buy direct from your Paypal-enabled site.

    Thanks for contributing!!

  12. Thanks TJ for your response. I pretty much agree with you – people get caught up in the process of trying out the newest online thing – then many “set it and forget it.” For some, it’s an issue of they are not really comfy with technology, others don’t quite see how these tools CAN build relationships that lead to sales. But they do, when used well, they add another potential touch point for clients, where they are comfortable, and one more tool in your basket to help reach out. But you have to reach out, you have to participate.

    I’ll be sure to point this post out to my client here so she can get in on this conversation, or at least listen in. She is doing something right with her products – she just had a clients at a show say something like – “I don’t usually buy my holiday gifts this early, but I LIKE you, and what you are doing with your garden…so I’m going to buy them from you right now.” We’re currently working on streamlining her website’s store then we’ll look toward other outposts like those mentioned here, and engaging where her customers “hang out.”

  13. Adding another point to CathyWebSavvyPR and TJ, if you are serious about what you are doing, then you would need to create a website for your small business. Something to keep in mind when creating such a website is how you can expose your products. We’ve created the photo gallery tool from soloago.com. Basically, you make the photo galleries all by yourself (no coding required) and then you publish those galleries.

  14. For me, now i start as etsy and bonanza . Thank you for detail.

  15. Sourcing Handmade is a new site launched in Feb. 2012. It is a boutique sourcing consultancy aimed to help handmade artisans, crafters, and indie designers get their items sold in brick-and-mortar boutiques.

  16. Please add Ujamaa Essentials to the list. A new site just launched as a co-op for handmade product makers. They promote a naturalistic way of life and will be offering flea markets, brick and mortar as well as online selling avenues

  17. I am ever so grateful for mention of my ArtFire shop (Saturday Sails Gift Shop) in TJ’s article. I have since had to let it go, although I am still online at http://saturdaysails.blogspot.com/ and Facebook “Saturday Sails.” Thank you.

  18. Hi TJ,

    This is a really great list and a good resource for both buying as well as selling. One more website that I suggest that you can look into is Craftsvilla. It is an Indian online store where one can buy as well as sell their handcrafted items. It is a relative startup established only in 2011.

  19. Hi all
    I have a many of Yemeni Hand crafts products which is very beautiful and attractive,
    I’m looking for buyer in USA,Canad and Europe to buy my variety products , if some body is interesting,send me his/her email for sending some photos of it ,
    you can email me “nasg1980@yahoo.com” if you need some information
    Best
    Nabil

  20. great article some of these venues I have never heard of will go check them out!!

    Thanks!!

  21. Another new website for handmade items is Shop For HandMade:

    http://www.shopforhandmade.com

    Just newly launched and in beta testing, you get your own website which you can edit, add text, images and easily edit your shop.

    Take a look at one of the first shops to go live:

    http://shopforhandmade.com/DrKSoap

    No fees to list items or contracts, just a small monthly payment. Visit the website and see if you want more than just a shop. :)

  22. Another place added to the list is http://www.fashionhaunt.com, no listing cost, unlimited item posting at one time, unlimited time to market their item.

  23. I thought you might wanted to know that Craftsly has changed its name to Goodsmiths, and only charges a commission fee of 2% for a special time offer (2.5% regular) no listing fee, no set up fee.

    It seems like a good site, I’ve tried storeenvy several times myself, and it just didn’t work out, it doesn’t target the audience I want to target. Thank you for the list!

  24. The definition and difference between handcrafted and handicrafts is sometimes blurred. Everything is passed on as handcrafted. its more what qualifies a creations craft value, not its add to cart value.

  25. Here is another site dedicated to quality handmade crafts …… No mass produced crafts allowed here (No imported items from china claiming to be handcrafted): http://www.theamericanmom.com

  26. Hello TJ, you have a very complete list of venues here, will like to add: http://trembu.com/

    TrEmbu’s culture it’s Simple and Transparent!

    Sell anything of quality and value, handmade, designed, invented or found. List and Sell FREE. NO monthly fees ever.

    OPEN your online store today and pay only $5.99 yearly membership.

    Thanks for the opportunity to add new venues.

    Nancy Velazquez CEO and founder

  27. Don’t forget ToSouk.com a relatively new UK based online marketplace to buy and sell handmade, vintage and collectables. It is FREE to list and has NO FEE for selling either. It’s worth checking out.

  28. Try http://www.artulis.com for selling in the UK : its free at the moment and pretty easy to use!

  29. Hello TJ,

    The list was great, thank you for the infomation. I wanted to let you know that we are just about to launch a new indie daily deal site at indogi.com that you may be interested in.

    It is a site dedicated to providing daily deals on indie products, while focusing on supporting the shops and artist we work with. indogi Daily Deals will be offering deals of 35% to 70% off quality indie goods and art. If it is an awesome product made by an independent shop, we want to offer it.

    We strive to provide merchant friendly deals by becoming an avenue for indie shops and artist to get their products out and heard about. indogi is devoted to work with each shop and artist individually to make sure that every deal will run and promote their work. We are passionate about this topic, because there are so many awesome projects and products being created right now, and we want everyone to get a chance to see them.

    So come check out our site, you’re bound to find something you like

    Take it easy,

    [edited by Editor]

  30. The GLC Arts and Crafts Mall is still offering a Free Store to Crafters who want to sell their product online.

  31. That Way Hat for milliners and hat makers to sell their handmade hats:
    https://www.thatwayhat.com/customers/apply

  32. Etsy’s a pretty good value at $.20 per item for four months.

  33. And don’t forget http://www.shophandmade.com. They redesigned their website and it is free to list and sell items. They are based entirely on donations.

  34. You can add http://www.artisanart.com.
    It is a French market place, with now 100 profesionnal artisans selling high value products.
    They will be translated later this year in Englisch, and will translate any foreign applicant at the moment, to help them sell in Europe.
    It is a free platform , with a 25% commission on sales, reduces to 17% when monthly turnover goes above 500€.

  35. You may want to check-out Storemate.com and artfire.com as good alternatives.
    If you want something different try out storemate.com, I registered on storemate.com and seen some sharp increase in the traffice directed to my website.
    Unlike easy and artfire they are not restricted to handmade, I get to promote to a bigger audience (all design buffs).
    The best about storemate is, I get to help out my customers in real-time using their ‘Talk-About’ feature. Helping out with questions on custom options, shipping queries etc in realtime.
    I even passed on exclusive discounts to them during these help-out sessions, which turned casual enquiries into quick sales and followers for me.
    I have been Storemate’s “Featured Designer” for 3 weeks, straight! ( My proud moment!) :D

  36. A new but very active marketplace and community is our project http://www.ezebee.com. We have sellers from over 40 countries, worth checking out…

  37. Try http://www.keapo.com it’s an easy to use mobile app free for sellers and buyers

  38. I made a few purchases at etsy and I’m very satisfied, however a friend suggested me to check the products at http://macondoartisans.com/ and I’m just in love, the accessories line is so different from many items I have seen, I bought a cigarrete case made of bamboo for my boyfriend and he loved it

  39. Hi TJ!
    http://www.maketank.it is a marketplace for Makers – we specialize in producer-direct sales of items made with innovative technologies like laser cutting, 3D printing and open hardware. We launched in February 2013 and so far have vendors in Italy and other areas of the EU – we’re ready to accept UK vendors and, if we find some good ones, can talk to USA vendors too!
    If you have any questions about MakeTank please feel free to email us.

  40. A new but very active marketplace http://www.ave21.com. No listing fee, Free Shop. Worth checking out…

  41. I sell my goods on TripleClicks, which I love. If you are an established business, there are no listing fees and a 15% fee when the item sells, so I am never out anything if a product sits awhile.

  42. I came across another site to sell crafts — http://www.craftsmencreations.com. I was a bit suspicious in the beginning because it was for free. But now, I am seeing results.

  43. Crafters and Artists Wanted to Sell on Ave 21 Marketplace. Free Store – No Listing Fee – No Minimum Number of Items – Paypal Shopping Cart – We get 3.5% only after a sale. Take A Look >
    http://www.ave21.com

  44. I hope some investors are reading this, because the market is ready for a high end fine craft and artisan selling platform. Aside from Ebay, Etsy and Rubylane, the other shops seem geared to inexpensive items, A scrabble tile on a silk ribbon, a piece of sushi made out of felt scraps. What about genuine fine craft and artisan goods? Hand carved furniture and wooden bowls, beautiful glassware and pottery, artisan glass beads, art to wear jewelry, even items as simple as artistically crafted cast – iron cook ware and hand knit sweaters. A site promoting items like $16.00 ‘sparkly bead on a delicate base metal chain’ necklaces (a popular style often tagged as ‘fine artisan crafted item’ on the other sites) isn’t going to attract clientele who’d purchase a $250.00 hand made bracelet crafted from sterling silver, natural turquoise and antique coral. The setting matters just as it does for brick and mortar shops.Example: Gumps and Neiman Marcus don’t set up shop at the local strip mall alongside JoAnne Fabric Superstores and the local Penny’s Outlet.

  45. Well, as the reach of internet and websites has increased to people, they have started preferring online ways of buying anything. Handicrafts items are easily available online these days and there are lots of manufacturers and providers making it possible to buy handicrafts online from there store. The number of shops and centers to buy crafted products is not fixed and not limited now and these can be bought from various online stores easily. One of the stores I came across can be found at http://www.indiancraftexport.com. It is availing a complete collection of beautiful handicraft items.

  46. There is Crafty Magpie too – we are an online marketplace for British crafters and designers to sell their creations

  47. I love artfire and bonanza.com also there is Ecrater
    there are a ton of sites out there. just have to dig. I love what you guys suggested. I thought that I’ve heard of them all. thanks!

    • I would recommend staying away from Bonanza. I have heard that they are extremely unfair to their sellers. I’ve heard they have shut down stores out of the blue with no contact and giving bogus reasons. I know this to be fact as I have a few relatives and friends that opened up shot there one of them selling for over 4 years and her shop was closed down with out warning and no notice given and she lost everything, all her pictures, her descriptions everything. they gave some bogus reason but she said the real reason was because she wouldn’t give out her credit card information and chose to pay with paypal and not a credit card. They’ve done this to many sellers. So now I stay away from there.

  48. Another handmade site to check out! Ananasa.com is now a global brand known for their intricate handmade items under many different categories, focused on artisans from around the Middle East and North African region. Artists can open a free store with a small fee taken from each sale with Ananasa doing all the marketing, shipping facilitation and exposure for them. They also have a blog that engages with different bloggers for cool DIY’s, recipes and even telling the stories of some of their undiscovered and very talented artists. The bargain button feature is one of the coolest features on the site that allows buyer to confidentially negotiate pricing of an item in a comfortable and easy to use virtual bazaar system.

  49. We have a vendor marketplace for mom created businesses. We list products and services. Etsy meets Angie’s List. Join us, only $29 a year for your own store front, marketing, SEO and promotion.

  50. I will make some handmade articles . I want to sell that articles

  51. Great post, TJ!

    This is definitely a helpful article for myself and I’m pretty sure many others as creating beaded jewelry and handlooms is one of my favorite hobbies during my free time – now I will, with the help of this article, slowly transition it to a business :)

    Regards,
    Sunaina K.

  52. Thanks for this article and this list. There is a big demand by makers out there to find new ways to sell.

    Over the past few years, I’ve done a lot of research and have published a free directory of where to sell art and crafts online, which now has expanded to over 250 listings. I believe it is currently the biggest directory of its kind on the internet and can be seen here http://www.artsyshark.com/125-places-to-sell/

  53. Carolyn, I’d love for you to add Sourcing Handmade to your directory. It is for makers looking to sell wholesale to boutiques. I’m launching online wholesale ordering this fall.

  54. I tried Etsy, and ebay. Didn’t sell anything. Maybe I will just give up for now. Thanks for the list anyway.

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