December 20, 2014

It’s So Easy To Get Lost In The Details But Don’t Quit

When you’re working to build a business, it seems like the first hurdle is to get going. Just like track runners, you do an extensive amount of work to get you to the starting line.

starting line

Your pre-season training and practice includes all those early steps like:

  1. market research to see who needs and wants what you have
  2. strategy planning to lay out a simple roadmap for the business and
  3. office set up to have an efficient and inspiring place to work

All this effort just to “open your doors.”  It was exciting at first, but now the details overwhelm you.

Keep Going

Make a simple choice to keep moving forward no matter what.  To help you do this Susan L. Reid in “Are You Getting In The Way Of Your Startup Success?” suggests that you keep your mind together and yourself inspired by breaking “down your to-do list into small, bite-size segments that leave you feeling energized and successful.”

Instead of looking at that big master list that you need to finish, take a small piece of it and put it on your list for the day. Replace “launch my new website” with “write my front page copy” and “post my headshot.” Simple consistent steps will get you there.

Get Help

In “How To Build A Virtual Marketing Team” Ivana Taylor suggests that you get help. Instead of doing it all yourself you can build a virtual team to implement different aspects of your project. But she makes on important point:

 “Working with virtual teams forces you to create very detailed work instructions.”

To make the most of this team, you have to get very clear about what you want from them.

Get Clear

Virtual teams make you redefine how you have a meeting. In addition to using technology to hold one on one or group meetings when necessary, you have to get to the point quickly — your virtual team may bill by the hour, so you don’t want to waste the time.  In “Why Meetings Are A Waste Of Time And How To Run Them More Efficiently” John Mariotti says meetings should be “no longer than they need to last.”

You meet to train, inform, brainstorm. And the type of meeting and purpose for it will help you determine the time frame. Whether it’s the mindset, the marketing or the meetings, just keep it moving toward your goal, you’ll get there.

“Failure will never overtake you, if your determination to succeed is strong enough.” ~ Og Mandino, Author of The Greatest Salesman in the World


Starting Line Photo via Shutterstock

5 Comments ▼

Jamillah Warner


Jamillah Warner Jamillah Warner (Ms.J), a poet with a passion for business, is a Georgia-based writer and speaker and the Marketing Coordinator at Nobuko Solutions. She also provides marketing and communication quick tips in her getCLEAR! MicroNewsletter.

5 Reactions

  1. Thanks for this terrific post, Jamillah.

    The link to Ivana Taylor’s Open Form post was golden, as were your suggestions.

    This, “Doing it all alone” stuff has got to go!

    The Franchise King®

  2. It’s very important to remember that you’ll have days you’re discouraged and it seems like the obstacles ahead of you are impossible.

    Sometimes the best thing for me is to just step away from things for a little while to clear my head–to take a time out and not think or do anything with trying to figure out the business issues. Usually after a day I’m recharged and anxious to get back at things!

    I definitely agree with breaking things down into bite sized goals. It’s a lot less daunting then looking at your entire master plan with 100s of things to finish! Great article, thank you.

  3. Getting help is so important. Pride gets in so may peoples way. Asking for help doesn’t mean you are a failure, it means you know when to look for an expert to provide the best product out there

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