October 22, 2014

The Rebel Entrepreneur Rewrites The Rulebook

The Rebel EntrepreneurTo the mainstream business world we entrepreneurs are extremely unusual. The mainstream business world doesn’t understand us. They don’t understand how we do business. They don’t understand our creativity. Our drive. Our ambition. The risks we take every day. And how in the world could we be successful doing some of the things we do?!

We may not wear expensive suits. We may not be comfortable at a cocktail party or at the country club. And we may not be people who everyone in town knows. But we are the people who make this country strong. We are the driving force to the economy.

When it comes to entrepreneurship, the rules of good business are the same but also different. To be a successful entrepreneur, there’s got to be some rebel inside of you.

So needless to say the book, The Rebel Entrepreneur: Rewriting the Business Rulebook by Jonathan Moules (@Jonathan_Moules), got my attention when the book publicist contacted me. As I began to read the book, I found the book to be right up my alley with its direct and candid approach about how to run to a successful business in the post Great Recession era.

The book would be a good business read for anyone thinking of going into business, just starting out on their rebel entrepreneur journey but also any longtime rebel entrepreneurs with any sort of a business track record.

The Rebel Entrepreneur is filled with examples of entrepreneurial success citing companies new and old, big and small, familiar and those not quite so familiar, plus companies of this global, Internet age we currently do business in. Some well-known entrepreneurs are mentioned too such as James Dyson, Richard Branson, Walt Disney and Steve Jobs.

But beyond the names of companies and entrepreneurs who have made it big in business, the book has a lot of practical advice for business people. As I was reading the book I found myself often relating to and agreeing with the information in each chapter. It’s business advice I have given to CEOs, business owners and entrepreneurs over the years.

Here’s a summary of what’s in the book:

  • Chapter 1: Funding: Loans, bank alternatives and bootstrapping
  • Chapter 2: Innovation, imitation, timing and execution
  • Chapter 3: Leadership: When to lead and when to step aside
  • Chapter 4: Pricing: To increase or cut prices in today’s economy
  • Chapter 5: Business plans: Constant change, testing, and pivoting
  • Chapter 6: The title says it all: You cannot cut your way to success
  • Chapter 7: Sales: Hiring right to build a team and identify the right sales opportunities
  • Chapter 8: Again, the title says it all: Failure is not failure if you learn

In Chapter 8, there is a quote from Samuel Goldwyn, the famous American film producer:

“The harder I work, the luckier I become.”

How true. Being an entrepreneur takes will, drive and determination. Plus a lot of long days and late nights. Constant dedication to your goal of business success.

The Rebel Entrepreneur offers good, sound, practical business advice to help you build a better company no matter what is happening in the economy.

Now go out and sell something. Make it happen. Be a rebel entrepreneur!

3 Comments ▼

Howard Lewinter


Howard Lewinter Howard Lewinter guides, focuses and advises CEOs, presidents and business owners to greater business success throughout the United States. Howard also publishes a blog about business success, Talk Business With Howard, where he shares his insight and perspective about leadership, management or any business topic that relates to running a successful business.

3 Reactions

  1. Interesting book. The lifestyle of successful entrepreneurs are often depicted in the media these days as rich and wealthy. Many of the outlets totally skipped the part where we put in hard work and sheer determination.

    It’s good to see that we have another practical book about entrepreneurship on the bookshelves.

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