November 27, 2014

Review of Speak Like Yourself: No, Really!

Front-Cover-SMHave you ever given a business presentation and thought to yourself, “The words aren’t coming out right.  That doesn’t sound like me.  That’s not what I intended to say.”

Or have you ever sat down to prepare a business speech to present in front of your company or an industry group and had absolutely no idea where to begin?

Do you panic, get sweaty palms or sick to your stomach, just before a business presentation?

If you can relate to any of the above business situations, I may have just the book for you to read that can help you become a better speaker no matter what business circumstance you find yourself in.

When the book came across my desk, I thought to myself:

“Oh, it’s just another book on public speaking.”

Then I started to leaf through the pages. What caught my eye was the title: “Speak Like Yourself – No, Really!  Follow Your Strengths and Skills to Great Public Speaking” by Jezra Kaye.

What I learned very quickly in the book is that to be an effective speaker: You’ve got to be yourself.

You need to be your authentic self when you make a business presentation no matter the size of your audience. In order for people to buy your message, they first need to accept who you are and what you represent. That’s why you need to “Speak like yourself – No, really!”

Kaye, @jezrakaye, takes you step-by-step through the public speaking process from first thought to the closing sales pitch or final bow.

You’ll learn how to:

  • Prepare a speech that brings value to your prospects or customers, employees or listening audience; practice giving it powerfully; and connect with your audience.
  • Be a relaxed, confident, competent business speaker.
  • Successfully handle pitches, PowerPoint, meetings, Q&A, off-the-cuff remarks, small talk, job interviews, networking, public speaking panic, and a host of other communications challenges.

The book is for speakers at all levels of experience.

If you’re new to public business speaking, you’ll find a road map for success that demystifies this sometimes-scary process, and allows you to move forward, with confidence, at your own pace.

If you’re an experienced business speaker, you’ll learn to refine and focus your presentations, practice for more predictable success, and connect with your audience at a whole new level.

What I Really Liked

I really like that the book is its own presentation. This easy-to-read book speaks directly to you through its words. The chapters are organized as though Kaye is having a private one-on-one session with you.

The book also includes an “Instant Speech Worksheet” plus how to “Discover Your Public Speaking Personality – are you a Reliable, a Helper, an Improver or an Experiencer?”

At the very end of the book, Kaye talks about having fun during speaking engagements.

By reading this book and going on the journey of finding, practicing and defining who you are as a business speaker, you really will find that speaking can be fun – rather than something that just goes with the job and you must do it.

4 Comments ▼

Howard Lewinter


Howard Lewinter Howard Lewinter guides, focuses and advises CEOs, presidents and business owners to greater business success throughout the United States. Howard also publishes a blog about business success, Talk Business With Howard, where he shares his insight and perspective about leadership, management or any business topic that relates to running a successful business.

4 Reactions

  1. Good post.

    As I read in Set Godin’s new book, “Icarus Deception,” the problem is that lot of people don’t speak well. This then carries over to their writing.

    The lesson being that we should improve the way we talk.

    Thanks.

    @5ToolGroup

  2. Thanks for the review, Howard. Another one to add to my “to read” list. :)

    Ti

  3. Howard, THANK YOU for this thoughtful and comprehensive review. I’m thrilled that you found the book valuable!

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