October 1, 2014

Craig Sutton


Craig Sutton Craig Sutton is the owner of Sutton Brand Management. Using his background in tech, including 5 years managing the servers and networking team for a major regional Internet provider and also owner of an IT and Web software development firm, he harnesses the power of digital and traditional marketing to help small to medium sized businesses excel.

20 Reactions

  1. Static IP is worth “the small price you pay for it.” Really?? It was $5 from Comcast less than 5 years ago. Now it’s $14.95. That’s roughly half the cost of what many pay for full Internet service WITH a dynamic IP address.

    • It is a small price based on its necessity… that was really what I meant. If you don’t have to have a static ip for some technical need then its not a problem. There are also some Dynamic DNS services out there, but reliability can still be an issue.

    • I have 5 ip addresses through Comcast and i AM PAYING 15.95 a month having a static ip is a necessity if you are hosting anything or have remote users…. I have five for several reasons…… if I need to do a presentation in the value of in house server vs cloud I can segment it off of my company network and not worry about causing traffic…… and besides all the cool kids have them

      • Craig: $15.95 a month seems pretty reasonable to me for 5 static IP addresses. Is that the limit you can get for that price?

      • Craig, I’ve just read Andrew Hargreave’s comment at the bottom. Have you? If you haven’t, I think perhaps you should as he mentioned something that might happen to you re: Comcast.

  2. Hmm. I didn’t know about the difference and the importance of static/dynamic IPs, so thanks for that. I guess it’s similar to paying for/registering your own domain name vs tagging onto an existing one while not having your own extension.

    • A static ip for business is more about accessibility of your network from the outside of your office. the gentleman above for instance mentioned the additional costs as not being inexpensive, but if you can host your own domain, those costs are offset by what would have been a cost of an external hosting provider, just as a for instance.

      • Thanks for that, Craig. I guess I was making an analogy; the independence of having your own domain vs not; the independence of having a static ip vs a dynamic one.

      • I’d disagree that costs are offset versus an external hosting provider. Assuming your domain’s data technologies – things like domain authentication, email, website – are ‘mission critical’ to your business remaining operational, the investments in hardware, power, cooling, software, protection appliances (routers, firewalls, UPS batteries) for most small businesses wouldn’t make sense, not to mention hiring – whether full time or outsourced – the expertise to install, setup, secure and maintain the environment. Then comes the decision of whether to buy or lease, and if you lease dealing with the costs associated with the refresh cycle… it’s all very much a pain.

        Depending on the complexity of the applications and functions your data services need to fulfill, you’re probably better off either using widely available cloud services like Office365 and Microsoft Azure, or finding a datacenter service provider to co-locate with. If you have nothing critical on-premise, then the need for a static IP scheme locally evaporates, and most (if not all) of the aforementioned concerns get offloaded to the service provider.

  3. Great info, Craig.

    I remember talking to my high-speed provider about a static ip once or twice.

    Way too much money. I haven’t found the need for one. Yet.

    The Franchise King®

    • How much money did your provider say it was at the time, Joel?

      I don’t expect I’ll have a need for one anytime soon. However, was just curious about how much it was, especially if you considered it to be dear.

  4. So this is what they are talking about when some tech geeks keep telling me that Internet providers keep changing their IP addresses. I guess it is not a good thing then.

    • I guess, from my understanding of the post, IP addresses that are changed can be a good or bad thing depending on what one’s needs are.

      • That is correct, static ip are really only necessary in specific instances. There are also downside to having one from a security aspect. Like anything in business, making a list of positives and negatives before making the decision is key. But when you have to have it… they really aren’t that expensive for the benefit.

    • How much is it on average, Craig? Nerd Uno mentioned $14.95 (a month?). Joel also mentioned a price was quoted to him that was way too much money. So how much is it roughly?

  5. I beg to differ about the “cost” of a static IP. Either way, whether you utilize static or dynamic, you’re going to obtain at least one IP address. In the ISP world you’re merely going to assign an IP address from a dedicated pool or reserve something in your DHCP scopes for the client. At most, you may end up adding a route here or there on a few routers; however, that would be the cause for a poor design of the ISP.

    Regardless of how it works, you’re getting an IP address no mater what; thus, I fail to see why the additional charge for a single static IP. None-the-less, it has become “standard” in the industry so most people rarely blink an eye when they have to obtain a static IP. However, as I have noticed, the cost differential for a single IP and a /28 block is insignificant so most people will just get a /28 block and have a few more IPs to use at their will.

  6. Michael Brian Bentley

    Being charged for static IP addresses is an absurd cost of doing business. It’s on the same level as paying hundreds of dollars for each foot of deoxygenated braided speaker wire. It’s like requiring drafting shoes while working on CAD/CAE. Did you know that the telephone company charged extra for Touchtone[R] phone service for years after it became much easier to support than rotary dial phones? This is worse than because network providers invented the itemized charge out of whole cloth instead of keeping it around for much too long. Charging for a static IP for a customer that is always connected is ludicrous. What’s really ludicrous: jacking up the monthly rate for a static IP. “But they guarantee they always get the same IP address when the lease is renewed!” You know, that’s what all the computers are for.

  7. Andrew Hargreave

    I’ve had Comcast Business for almost 10 years for my home based – IT services company and have had 13 static IPs. I was paying $14.95 per month for that with no complaints. However, this month’s bill suddenly raised the price to $34.94 per month with no warning, no explanation…nada! Not a happy camper today. Unfortunately, there’s nothing anyone can do about it.

  8. allan regenbaum

    Same with me ..sudden price increase for something that I have had for over 10 years. No note, nothing. On calling Comcast, always subjected to pure arrogance …. They tell me my account was audited and im out of contract so they adjust my account….. So not only has latency increased with slow page responses across the board (does not help if you have 50Mbps on the highway but the on ramps are closed !!), but price goes up for a component that has no incremental cost basis. Its so wrong in so many ways…. too big to fail …. I hope not…..

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