October 20, 2014

How A New Perspective Can Bring You Better Business Days

Personal Branding Blog Publisher Channel Content by
Personal Branding Blog

new perspective

The sun was streaming through the window to suggest that negotiation and a willingness to consider a new perspective applies to both personal and business life.

Your personal life provides insights for how to conduct business better and experience in business provides realization of how to negotiate better on the personal side, too.

The Neighbor and the Tree

For years, unwanted trees grew and intertwined with a beautiful walnut tree. Over the years, John refused to listen to his neighbors on the street who chastised him for not cutting down the unwanted trees to save the walnut. It was Albert, a fairly new neighbor, who suffered more of the consequences and who figured out how to persuade John to do the right thing. He used his corporate insight for changing John’s perspective.

Given Albert’s vegetable garden did not have enough sun, and the unwanted trees made a mess all over his yard, it was suggested John and he share the expense of removing the undesirable trees. The trimming took place and suddenly sunshine and open space were seen in both yards. It became a win for all – including the vegetables.

Demands Don’t Work – Start With Questions First

Whether you have a tree or a business, demanding something be done your way rarely works. Getting the other party to agree takes a willingness to learn the history of the situation by asking many questions. Insistent assertiveness rarely works.

Once you understand how the situation developed, ask additional questions to find the associated problems as they pertain to current circumstances.

When you are the one wanting to make a change, the pain points are your friends. Your challenge is to find as many of them as possible, as these are what will gradually change the other party’s perspective to yours. At the very least, you will be met half-way.

As each problem unfolds, dig deeper to find how it is further affecting business. Once the dialogue develops, the other party will recognize it’s time to get everything on the table to determine how the issues may be resolved.

Admission to problems will encourage an open dialogue to find solutions. Creativity works best because offering several suggestions to solve a problem will more likely find a good cure than just going down a familiar path. Most often, costs are attached to solutions. This is why multiple solutions should be sought so that the most cost-effective solution may be selected and implemented.

Once the solution is selected, confirm all of the details involved such as who, what, when, where and why. Establish a timeline for completion. Be appreciative of the other person’s willingness to move forward. As the implementation begins, be available to discuss any hiccups as well as satisfactions with the transformation from problem to solution.

Upon resolving the problem, thank the other person again for the willingness to work with you. Be certain expectations were met and that satisfaction is high. Once you have this in place, you will be far more likely to receive repeat business, referrals and testimonials. You will have demonstrated a flexible personal brand and achieved the smooth sale!

Sunny Perspective Photo via Shutterstock

More in: 2 Comments ▼

Personal Branding Blog


Personal Branding Blog The Personal Branding Blog is part of the Small Business Trends Publisher Channel, offering branding and career advice from Dan Schawbel and his team of experts. The blog helps professionals build a powerful brand to remain competitive in the job market.

2 Reactions

  1. It never fails to have an open mind. It lets you see the situation from a different perspective and let you see the situation in the way others see it. With this, you can arrive at a better solution to the problem whether it be personal or business.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>



Compare your business to the industry - Try our new tool