October 9, 2015

Jack Yoest

Jack Yoest

John Wesley (Jack) Yoest Jr., is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Management at The Catholic University of America. Professor Yoest is a senior business mentor in high-technology, medicine, non-profit and new media consulting.

His expertise is in management training and development, operations, sales, and marketing. He has worked with clients in across the USA, India and East Asia.

Professor Yoest teaches graduate business students and is the president of Management Training of DC, LLC.

He has been published by Scripps-Howard, National Review Online, The Business Monthly, The Women’s Quarterly and other outlets.

Professor Yoest served as a gubernatorial appointee in the Administration of Governor James Gilmore in the Commonwealth of Virginia. During his tenure in state government, he acted as the Chief Technology Officer for the Secretary of Health and Human Resources where he was responsible for the successful Year 2000 (Y2K) conversion for the 16,000-employee unit.

He also served as the Assistant Secretary for Health and Human Resources, acting as the Chief Operating Officer of the $5 billion budget. Prior to this post, Mr. Yoest managed entrepreneurial, start-up ventures, which included medical device companies, high technology, software manufacturers, and business consulting companies.

His experience includes managing the transfer of patented biotechnology from the National Institutes of Health to his client, which enabled the company to raise $25 million in venture capital funding. He served as Vice President of Certified Marketing Services International, an ISO 9000 business-consulting firm, where he assisted international companies in human resource certification.

He is a former Captain in the United States Army having served in Combat Arms. Professor Yoest earned an MBA from George Mason University and completed graduate work in the International Operations Management Program at Oxford University.

He has been active on a number of Boards and has competed in 26.2-mile marathon runs. Professor Yoest is married to Charmaine Yoest, Ph.D., who is president and CEO of a public interest law firm.

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