Book Review — Workination: Are you Fascinated with Your Career?





Book Review of WorkinationThe other day, our dinner conversation turned to job-hopping. Those of us over 40 can remember the days when spending less than five years on a job was considered unreliable and erratic behavior, and that probably meant that there was something wrong with you because you couldn’t hold down a job.

In today’s fast moving marketplace many of us can expect to experience several careers in our lifetime. So that means that it’s never too late to make a change, figure out what we’re meant to do and get out there and do it.

Then along comes Workination. Are You Fascinated With Your Career?

The title, “Workination,” is a combination of the words “Work” and “Fascination.” Todd Royer has done what many business authors failed to do; tell you that what he wants most for the reader is to have a “Fascination for the work that they do,” whether that work is their life’s calling, or a job that will take them to their career.

Todd Royer knows all about career change. His experience as a small business owner and the founder of DiscoveryTech, a technical recruiting firm, specializing in consumer products and materials research has led him to write “Workination.” This is a great little e-book for anyone searching for or changing their career.

“Workination” is a short, easy read. But more importantly, Todd has written it in second person, and his words are like chicken soup on a freezing day if you’re in the process of trying to figure out what your work calling is.

If you’re reading this and don’t have a job, don’t like the job you have, or you’re just thinking about making a career change, then this book will be like a heart-to-heart with a best friend.

Here is one of my favorite quotes from the book:

“Progressing in a career, in any field, is about developing the consciousness and habits of career building. In other words, stepping away from those daily tasks to reflect on your fascination with the future.”

And for those of us that grew up thinking that if we did all the right things, worked hard and were loyal employees he says:

“Don’t wait for others to take care of you. The days when a parent-like corporation provided step-by-step promotions based on diligence and hard work are long gone. You are responsible for your own career decisions”

The other aspect I like about this book is how it’s organized. It starts with YOU, the reader and your level of confidence, and then takes you through the process of visioning who you want to become in your life. Then once you’re clear on those things, he just dives into what I like most, practical actions you can take — like how to leave a voice mail message:

“When you leave voicemails, leave your number near the very beginning of your message. You can leave it at the end also, but make sure, when the listener replays the message (to copy your number) they won’t have to wait while the full message repeats.”

Then there are more tips that you can actually convert to actions for yourself and say: This week I’m going to focus on:

  • Volunteering to do the tasks no one wants to like making phone calls, taking minutes, etc.
  • Speak slowly and loudly on the telephone – be professional. Most people won’t notice when you do it right – but boy do they notice when you do it wrong.
  • Clean up your workspace
  • Develop your people skills; fall in love with the people you work with, try to turn work into play

These are just a few, and there are many, many more helpful, logical suggestions that will help everyone who works with people be memorable and well thought of.

Sometimes we all forget that we are a living, breathing advertisement, not just for our companies, but for ourselves. Todd helps us all to remember that having the work and career of your dreams is as much about how “choosable” we are to those we want to choose us as part of their team.

6 Comments ▼

Ivana Taylor


Ivana Taylor Ivana Taylor is the Book Editor for Small Business Trends. She is responsible for directing the site’s book review program and manages the team of professional book reviewers. She also spearheads the annual Small Business Book Awards. Ivana publishes DIYMarketers, where she shares daily do-it-yourself marketing tips, and is co-author of "Excel for Marketing Managers."

6 Reactions

  1. This sounds like a very inspiring read. I especially liked this quoted statement, “Develop your people skills; fall in love with the people you work with, try to turn work into play. . .” I try to do this everyday – and it works. But I know many friends that are at turning points in their life and could benefit from this read. I’ll be pointing them in this direction.

  2. With so many people who hate their jobs, this is probably a very inspiring read. I believe being miserable in a career makes you miserable in general. Who wants to live like that? Life is too short. I know someone who works for the post office who is miserable and has started taking antidepressants because of it. She won’t quit because she likes the amount of pay she receives. To me, no amount of money is worth being unhappy.

  3. Ivana Taylor

    Amen to that Amanda! I’ve actually been right there. And if someone had told me that you couldn’t pay me enough money to come in and work with certain people,. I never would have believed it. In fact, I would sit in the parking lot and cry just thinking about the day I would have. Then, I’d slog through the day – and at night I would worry myself to sleep thinking about the next day. I also learned that I didn’t enjoy any of the money I was making. I would go out shopping to buy things just because I could — thinking it would make me enjoy it. But that never worked. So the lesson for me was – it’s not about the money. It’s about finding joy in what you do and the people you do it with. I read this book from the mindset of where I had been – and found it to be very comforting.

  4. Martin Lindeskog

    Thanks for the book tip. I recommend you to read The Pathfinder by Nicholas Lore. http://www.rockportinstitute.com/pathfinder.php

  5. I agree about The Pathfinder comment. It is definitely the best book for people who want to become self-aware about the kinds of jobs they’d be best at. Questions of personality and personal values are abundant, in addition to what kind of work makes you tick.

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