How to Get Paid Sooner in Business

Publisher Channel Content by
Nextiva





One of the biggest pet peeves of small business owners is late-paying clients. We’re not running corporations, so cash flow can make or break our businesses. And when a client doesn’t pay on time, we can’t pay our own vendors.

It’s a sticky situation, but with a little strategy to light a fire under your clients, you can get paid not only on time but even seven (or more) days early.



Look at Why They’re Paying Late

If you have a client who typically pays on time, one late payment may be nothing to worry about. But analyze your accounts receivables to see if you have other clients who habitually pay their invoices after your due date.

Payment Policy

Next, look at your payment policy. Is it clear on each invoice when the payment is due? Do you let your client know at the beginning of your business relationship when payments are due? If it’s not clear to a client when you expect a payment, you can’t blame them for the problem.

If this is the case, send an email letting your clients know your payment policy. Consider sending this to all clients so those late-payers don’t feel you’re picking on them. Make it objective and simply a notification of your company policies. And make sure that due date is clear on each invoice.

You can also send a reminder a few days before the invoice is due. It’s completely understandable that your email invoice might have gotten lost in the stack of emails in your clients’ inbox.

Offer Incentive to Pay

There’s two ways to go about this:

  • Charge a penalty for late payments. Not everyone wants to take such a negative approach, but if you think that’s the right motivation to get your clients moving (after all, who wants to pay more if they can simply pay on time?), then try it out.
  • Offer a discount for early payment. You’ll have to decide how much money you’re willing to part with in order to get paid on time. Many businesses offer something like a 2% discount if the invoice is paid 7 days early, or even 5% off if they pay 14 days early. Make the amount enough to motivate them to pay early.

Whichever incentive you decide to offer, mention it in the email you send about your payment policy. It’s imperative that you clearly communicate any changes to your clients, as well as give them a heads up of a few weeks or even a month before this new policy kicks in. The last thing you want to do is upset your customers.

If They’re Still Not Paying on Time…

Consider each on a case-by-case basis.

Perhaps one client is having his own financial woes. In that case, set up a payment plan that works for both of you.

If it’s not a financial problem that’s keeping a client from paying on time, consider whether you truly want to continue working with a problematic client like this.

Money Photo via Shutterstock

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Melinda Emerson


Melinda Emerson Melinda Emerson, known to many as "SmallBizLady," is a Veteran Entrepreneur, Small Business Coach and Social Media Strategist who hosts #Smallbizchat for emerging entrepreneurs on Twitter. She is also the author of, Become Your Own Boss in 12 Months.

4 Reactions

  1. It’s important to remember that paying late is better than not paying at all, no matter how inconvenient it might be. Work with people so you get the former, not the latter.

  2. Aira Bongco

    While I do understand how late payments are okay because you are working with a particular client for a long time, that is really not a case for some type of services. I am still on the side that payments should be tackled on time no matter what happens. It is not that paying late is unforgivable (for it is if you have been working with a client for a long time) but they must still do their share of fulfilling their promise.

  3. Fortunately, I haven’t had that many problems with late payments. When it has happened, it’s been for a day or two. Though, there was one occasion when a payment was late by two months. I learnt from it for future dealings with other clients, so it wasn’t all bad.

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