Paris Wants to Mix Old and New With Eiffel Tower Upgrades (Watch)





The most recognizable landmark in Paris may be getting a makeover. The Eiffel Tower has been around since the late 1800’s. And while it’s still an iconic building, city officials in Paris feel that it could use a few updates.

The proposed changes would include adding security measures, improving the flow of tourists, upgrading elevators, paint, lights and more. Overall, it’s estimated that these upgrades will cost more than $300 million and will take about 15 years to complete.

That’s a major undertaking. But the city is reportedly interested in hosting the 2024 Summer Olympics. And if that’s the case, it might be necessary to add some value in the form of more practical features for the city’s most popular landmarks.



Sometimes, Change is Necessary

Old structures like the Eiffel Tower present a unique set of challenges to the cities or businesses that are charged with operating them. Changing the building completely would take away most, if not all, of the incentive for people to visit in the first place. But sometimes, change is necessary in order to keep those structures operating as they should in the modern age.

This concept is one that’s also relevant to a lot of businesses. Whether you’re actually operating an old tourist landmark or just have some old traditions that have helped your business succeed through the years, you need to find a way to mix the old and new in a way that makes sense for your business.

Eiffel Tower Photo via Shutterstock

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Annie Pilon


Annie Pilon Annie Pilon is a Senior Staff Writer for Small Business Trends, covering entrepreneur profiles, interviews, feature stories, community news and in-depth, expert-based guides. When she’s not writing she can be found on her personal blog Wattlebird, and exploring all that her home state of Michigan has to offer.

One Reaction

  1. Aira Bongco

    It is amazing how places like these are improved without losing touch of its old structure. It is about introducing the new and preserving the history.

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