More Small Businesses Eligible for Disaster Relief Due to Drought



small businesses eligible for disaster relief due to drought

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has announced that multiple counties across four states are now eligible to apply for an Economic Injury Disaster Loan of up to $2 million.



More Small Businesses Eligible for Disaster Relief Due to Drought

The loans are only available to small non-farm businesses, small agricultural cooperatives and small businesses engaged in aquaculture, as well as most private non-profit organizations of any size. The funds should help businesses in Hawaii, Texas, Idaho and Kansas struck by recent natural disasters to meet their financial obligations and operating expenses.

SBA Disaster Loan Eligibility

Director Tanya N. Garfield of the SBA’s Disaster Field Operations Center-West explained the eligibility requirements: “Eligibility for these loans is based on the financial impact of the disaster only and not on any actual property damage.

“These loans have an interest rate of 2.94 percent for businesses and 1.875 percent for private nonprofit organizations, a maximum term of 30 years and are available to small businesses and most private non-profits without the financial ability to offset the adverse impact without hardship.”

Applicants can apply online as well as receive additional information or download applications at the SBA Disaster Loan Assistance website.

Hawaii Counties

The loans have been offered to small non-farm businesses in three counties in Hawaii to help offset some of the economic losses caused by reduced revenues due to the droughts suffered in the Honolulu and Kalawao counties that began in March this year. The counties eligible for low-interest federal disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration are:



  • Honolulu
  • Kalawao
  • Maui

These Economic Injury Disaster Loans became possible in Hawaii after the recent drought was declared a disaster by the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture in May.

Texas Counties

There are 22 counties in Texas where small non-farm businesses are now eligible to apply for low?interest federal disaster loans. These loans are also intended to help offset the economic losses caused by the drought that started in March. There are nine primary counties that are eligible, including:

  • Aransas
  • Calhoun
  • Chambers
  • Galveston
  • Jackson
  • Matagorda
  • Nueces
  • Refugio
  • Victoria

There are also 13 neighboring counties that are also eligible, and include: Bee, Brazoria, Colorado, DeWitt, Goliad, Harris, Jefferson, Jim Wells, Kleberg, Lavaca, Liberty, San Patricio and Wharton.

Idaho Counties

Small non-farm businesses in five Idaho counties and two neighboring counties in Oregon are also now eligible to apply for low?interest federal disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration. Again, the loans should be used to offset any economic losses or reduced revenues caused by the March drought. The five eligible counties in Idaho include one primary and four neighboring Idaho counties, including:



  • Adams
  • Gem
  • Idaho
  • Valley
  • Washington

The two neighboring Oregon counties also now eligible are Baker and Wallowa.

Kansas Counties

Small non-farm businesses in five Kansas counties can also benefit from the SBA’s low?interest federal disaster loans. The drought hit hard in these counties too, so small businesses can use the loans to offset their economic losses caused by the disastrously dry weather. These counties include:

  • Finney
  • Gove
  • Lane
  • Ness
  • Scott

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Image: Depositphotos


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Gabrielle Pickard-Whitehead Gabrielle Pickard-Whitehead is a professional freelance writer and journalist based in the United Kingdom. Since 2006, Gabrielle has been writing articles, blogs and news pieces for a diverse range of publications and sites. You can read "Gabrielle’s blog here.".

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