Gas Prices Going Up Again



gas prices going up

Gas prices are once again going up for the second straight week. The national average retail price for a gallon of gas is now $ 3.799 up from last week’s $3.725 a gallon, according to the American Automobile Association (AAA). 



Gas Prices Going Up

The average gas price on Monday, Sept. 26 was up by more than four cents from the previous week’s $3.677. The average gas price on Monday, Oct. 3 is up by more than seven cents from last week’s retail price and has surpassed last month’s $3.796 price tag.

Across the nation, gas prices fluctuated from as high as $ 6.382 to a low of $ 3.057. Over the past week, gas prices have seen prices go up from 58 cents to less than one cent across the nation.

Since last Monday, these 10 states have seen the largest increases in their averages: California (+58 cents), Alaska (+53 cents), Oregon (+42 cents), Washington (+38 cents), Arizona (+38 cents), Nevada (+37 cents), Michigan (+19 cents), Illinois (+18 cents), Wisconsin (+16 cents), and Indiana (+16 cents)

Highest Gas Prices

StateRegularMid-GradePremiumDiesel 
California6.3826.5526.716.324
Nevada5.4835.6955.8975.221
Oregon5.4325.5785.7975.446
Alaska5.3435.4995.7125.134
Washington5.3075.4545.6525.459

California continues to experience the highest gas prices in the nation with the average gallon of gas price going $6.382 a gallon at the pump, up by 58 cents from last week. It remains the state with the most expensive gas price eclipsing the national average by $2.58.



Some counties in California continue to see steep gas prices above the state average of $ 6.382 with gas prices in Mono county, showing the most expensive gas price with a whopping $7.137 for a gallon of gas.

The states of Mississippi, Georgia, Louisiana Texas, Tennessee, South Carolina, Alabama, and Arkansas saw their average prices of a gallon of gas reach below the $3.30 mark.  The average retail price of gas in Mississippi now sells at 3.065 down from last week’s 3.081 and is 66 cents cheaper than the current national average.

Lowest Gas Prices

StateRegularMid-GradePremiumDiesel 
Mississippi3.0573.4243.7694.495
Texas3.0933.4513.7864.402
Louisiana3.0993.4533.8154.487
Georgia3.1733.5673.944.565
Tennessee3.1853.5583.9154.567

Why are Gas Prices Going Up?

The increase in the national average retail price for gas comes following concerns that Hurricane Ian could cause supply disruptions. Some 11 percent of crude oil production in the Gulf of Mexico was shuttered to prevent damage from Hurricane Ian.



Gas Price Trends

 RegularMid-GradePremiumDieselE85
Current Avg.3.7994.2674.5754.873.097
Yesterday Avg.3.7964.2614.5714.8733.101
Week Ago Avg.3.7254.1524.4714.8993.049
Month Ago Avg.3.7964.2344.5445.0743.115
Year Ago Avg.3.1963.5493.8213.3492.748

Data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), also indicate that gas demand has increased nationally from 8.32 million barrels a day to 8.83 million barrels a day last week. However, domestic gasoline stocks decreased by 2.4 million barrels to reach 212.2 million barrels. Higher gasoline demand amid tight supply and fluctuating oil prices have increased the national average.

State Gas Prices October 3, 2022

StateRegularMid-GradePremiumDiesel 
Alaska5.3435.4995.7125.134
Alabama3.1893.5593.9464.622
Arkansas3.2053.5693.9094.592
Arizona4.4874.7815.0534.891
California6.3826.5526.716.324
Colorado3.6934.034.334.642
Connecticut3.2773.824.2174.939
District of Columbia3.7514.3684.7194.942
Delaware3.3253.7814.0784.689
Florida3.2213.6263.9464.665
Georgia3.1733.5673.944.565
Hawaii5.2275.4715.7076.056
Iowa3.5693.8544.324.652
Idaho4.4214.5884.8164.982
Illinois4.1664.5985.0145.024
Indiana3.9874.394.765.135
Kansas3.393.6633.9714.592
Kentucky3.3963.7884.1354.75
Louisiana3.0993.4533.8154.487
Massachusetts3.4954.0674.3694.886
Maryland3.4463.9444.2474.707
Maine3.5233.8894.2614.923
Michigan4.1694.5524.9585.25
Minnesota3.6593.9744.3344.866
Missouri3.3293.6023.9284.623
Mississippi3.0573.4243.7694.495
Montana3.9544.2314.4914.865
North Carolina3.3073.6784.0344.622
North Dakota3.6873.9854.3974.678
Nebraska3.5673.8144.2754.694
New Hampshire3.3833.8894.2654.768
New Jersey3.4213.9934.2584.758
New Mexico3.6333.9544.2494.666
Nevada5.4835.6955.8975.221
New York3.5964.054.3944.997
Ohio3.6924.064.4364.972
Oklahoma3.4333.7463.9794.468
Oregon5.4325.5785.7975.446
Pennsylvania3.7694.1414.414.996
Rhode Island3.3293.9454.2584.749
South Carolina3.2613.6443.9794.605
South Dakota3.6563.8244.3014.625
Tennessee3.1853.5583.9154.567
Texas3.0933.4513.7864.402
Utah4.1564.3744.5714.79
Virginia3.3183.7414.0594.642
Vermont3.6524.1964.6414.838
Washington5.3075.4545.6525.459
Wisconsin3.9314.3064.754.671
West Virginia3.443.7063.9584.668
Wyoming3.8344.0674.3154.819

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1 Comment ▼

Samson Haileyesus Samson Haileyesus is a staff writer for Small Business Trends and has several years of progressive experience in media, communication and PR working with government, NGOs and private sector. He is passionate about public outreach, branding, media relations and marketing.

One Reaction
  1. Some of this is the trickle down from the situation in Europe, but some of this seems like gas companies (and refineries) taking advantage of the general inflationary mindset to raise prices (because they can blame so many other things).

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