What Should MBA Programs Teach Aspiring Entrepreneurs?


The Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University where I teach is getting ready to redesign its MBA program.

I’d like us to put in an entrepreneurship track that teaches students what entrepreneurs think that a person should learn in an MBA program. So I’m asking all of you what that is.

Should an entrepreneurship program teach the same things that are taught to students who want to go to work for someone else or should it teach something different? If the latter, what is that “something different”?

What areas are most important to focus on: accounting, finance, marketing, management, strategy, organizational behavior, information technology, operations management, or something else?

In each area, what are the most important courses to teach? And in those courses what topics should be covered?

If any of you have thoughts on this matter, please post your comments. If a lot of people offer their opinions, it would help me make a case about what the market thinks an entrepreneurship track in an MBA program should look like.

* * * * *

About the Author: Scott Shane is A. Malachi Mixon III, Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies at Case Western Reserve University. He is the author of seven books, including Illusions of Entrepreneurship: The Costly Myths that Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Policy Makers Live By and Finding Fertile Ground: Identifying Extraordinary Opportunities for New Ventures


More in:

Scott Shane Scott Shane is A. Malachi Mixon III, Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies at Case Western Reserve University. He is the author of nine books, including Fool's Gold: The Truth Behind Angel Investing in America ; Illusions of Entrepreneurship: and The Costly Myths that Entrepreneurs, Investors, and Policy Makers Live By.